Frequently Asked Questions

Often the most difficult part of entering into therapy is simply making the decision to start. If you have found your way to this site, you are at least considering therapy. To make the next step easier, I would like to present you with some ideas:

Attending the first session, no matter how tentative your thoughts are, doesn't mean you do not have choices.

I design the first session to allow you to make an informed decision. Setting the initial appointment simply means that you are taking the next step in allowing the possibility for change to occur in your life. It allows you to see how I work without having to make a commitment, without any strings attached.

  What is Counseling?

As a counsellor my aim is to provide you with a place to talk about your inner feelings, safe in the knowledge that I will not judge you, or think your problem is insignificant. I will not tell you what to do or give you advice. I will listen to what you have to say and try to help you get in touch with your feelings and emotions. I will offer you support.

The style of counselling I use is known as Person Centred Counselling. A Person Centred counsellor believes that we all have within us the ability to heal ourselves and, given the right conditions, we can find the answers to our problems ourselves. It is you, the client, who knows where the pain is. My role is to help you discover ways to deal with that pain.

I can offer you a place to talk about what you are feeling and experiencing – perhaps for the first time someone who will listen to YOU.

  Does Counseling suit you?

Perhaps you are feeling confused, isolated, alone, unable to cope, or worried about a situation or feelings that you are having?

You might be feeling unsure of what to do, but perhaps talking will help?

You could be someone who has undertaken counselling before and is looking for another counsellor to work with this time round?

Or, you could be someone who knows 'there's something wrong' and would like to make a change, but are unsure of where to start?

Counseling can help if:

  • You need a bit of extra help to solve a problem or make changes in your life.
  • You feel it could be useful to get someone's perspective on things who is objective, understanding and who will not judge you, someone who isn't a family member or close friend.
  • You want some space and time to explore your feelings, make some sense of them in a way you haven't before.

I am committed and passionate about offering a secure, accepting space for you to explore your feelings or problems without judgement, to hear and understand you and your experience of life.

My philosophy is not to give advice or tell you what to do, but to work with you to help you find the solution that best suits you, by offering some alternative perspectives or helping you to understand yourself better.

Counselling may not suit everyone, but most people benefit from having time and space to reflect on their life and what they want to change.

  How can therapy help me?

A number of benefits are available from participating in therapy. Therapists can provide support, problem-solving skills, and enhanced coping strategies for issues such as depression, anxiety, relationship troubles, unresolved childhood issues, grief, stress management, body image issues and creative blocks. Many people also find that counselors can be a tremendous asset to managing personal growth, interpersonal relationships, family concerns, marriage issues, and the hassles of daily life. Therapists can provide a fresh perspective on a difficult problem or point you in the direction of a solution. The benefits you obtain from therapy depend on how well you use the process and put into practice what you learn. Some of the benefits available from therapy include:

  • Confidence in your ability to cope
  • Clarity about your life choices
  • Effectively managing fear and other emotions
  • Feeling more relaxed and in balance, even if you are busy
  • Efficient productivity
  • More satisfying relationships
  • The capacity to enjoy yourself and your life

  Do I really need therapy? I can usually handle my problems.

Everyone goes through challenging situations in life, and while you may have successfully navigated through other difficulties you've faced, there's nothing wrong with seeking out extra support when you need it. In fact, therapy is for people who have enough self-awareness to realize they need a helping hand, and that is something to be admired. You are taking responsibility by accepting where you're at in life and making a commitment to change the situation by seeking therapy. Therapy provides long-lasting benefits and support, giving you the tools you need to avoid triggers, re-direct damaging patterns, and overcome whatever challenges you face.

  Why do people go to therapy and how do I know if it is right for me?

People have many different motivations for coming to psychotherapy. Some may be going through a major life transition (unemployment, divorce, new job, etc.), or are not handling stressful circumstances well. Some people need assistance managing a range of other issues such as low self-esteem, depression, anxiety, addictions, relationship problems, spiritual conflicts and creative blocks. Therapy can help provide some much needed encouragement and help with skills to get them through these periods. Others may be at a point where they are ready to learn more about themselves or want to be more effective with their goals in life. In short, people seeking psychotherapy are ready to meet the challenges in their lives and ready to make changes in their lives.

  What is therapy like?

Because each person has different issues and goals for therapy, therapy will be different depending on the individual. In general, you can expect to discuss the current events happening in your life, your personal history relevant to your issue, and report progress (or any new insights gained) from the previous therapy session. Depending on your specific needs, therapy can be short-term, for a specific issue, or longer-term, to deal with more difficult patterns or your desire for more personal development. Either way, it is most common to schedule regular sessions with your therapist (usually weekly).

It is important to understand that you will get more results from therapy if you actively participate in the process. The ultimate purpose of therapy is to help you bring what you learn in session back into your life. Therefore, beyond the work you do in therapy sessions, your therapist may suggest some things you can do outside of therapy to support your process - such as reading a pertinent book, journaling on specific topics, noting particular behaviors or taking action on your goals. People seeking psychotherapy are ready to make positive changes in their lives, are open to new perspectives and take responsibility for their lives.

  What about medication vs. psychotherapy?

It is well established that the long-term solution to mental and emotional problems and the pain they cause cannot be solved solely by medication. Instead of just treating the symptom, therapy addresses the cause of our distress and the behavior patterns that curb our progress. You can best achieve sustainable growth and a greater sense of well-being with an integrative approach to wellness. Working with your medical doctor you can determine what's best for you, and in some cases a combination of medication and therapy is the right course of action.

  Does what we talk about in therapy remain confidential?

Confidentiality is one of the most important components between a client and psychotherapist. Successful therapy requires a high degree of trust with highly sensitive subject matter that is usually not discussed anywhere but the therapist's office. You can expect that what you discuss in session will not be shared with anyone.

However, professional ethics require therapists to maintain confidentiality except in situations where the therapist has reason to suspect the client is seriously in danger of harming him/herself or has threated to harm another person.

  Does going to therapy mean I am weak?

There is a misconception that going to therapy means you are weak and lack in something! Unfortunately we are made to believe that we should somehow be able to handle all of life's challenges by ourselves. This is not true. Infact, it shows much more strength to face life's difficulties by looking at them and dealing with them. Seeking help means that you are hopeful and know that you deserve better!

  How will long it take? What can I expect?

The first thing you need to know is that making the decision to go into therapy does not mean that you are signing up for life! Depending on the problems that we address in our sessions we can be effective and obtain clarity and practice change in as little as 10 sessions, or it could take six months or longer.

  How long is a therapy session?

Typically, a session last for 60 minutes. Depending on your specific needs, appointments may be scheduled twice per week.



WHAT NEXT

So, if you're looking for extra support and guidance through a challenging life situation, I look forward to working with you and helping you. Please call me at (0) 9582800790, or email me at Aparna@lifeskillsexperts.com. We can discuss the options that might best work for you and agree on a course of action.

My Approach